The Mla pathway – a potential Achilles heel for gram-negative bacteria?

Researchers from the University of California San Diego have identified a potential new target against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections – which could be applied to help treat all gram-negative infections. It was found that by interfering with the Mla pathway in P. aeruginosa, the bacteria became more permeable, and more susceptible to immune components. P. aeruginosa, … Read more

New study highlights the prevalence of resistance genes in Kenya

The bacterial species Klebsiella may contribute to a dangerously high level of antibiotic resistance in Kenya, a recent study suggests. Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the study is a collaborative effort between institutions including the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI). In many developing nations, the occurrence of … Read more

A major source of antibiotics may also contribute to antibiotic resistance, new research suggests

A major source of antibiotics may also contribute to antibiotic resistance, new research suggests

Could pathogens obtain antibiotic resistance genes from the same organisms that we use to produce our antibiotics? A new study suggests that this could indeed be the case, as resistance genes bearing striking similarity to one another are found in two key groups of microorganisms. In addition, the study resulted in the proposal of a … Read more

WHO’s Essential Medicine List updated, with new guidelines on how antibiotics should used

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has updated their Essential Medicines List (EML), adding 10 new antibiotics which should be used in adults, and 12 for children. In addition, they’ve also decided to try a new approach to combat antibiotic resistant bacteria by dividing antibiotics into three different categories; access, watch and reserve. It’s hoped that … Read more

A triple modified form of vancomycin boosts the drug’s antibacterial power

A modified form of vancomycin gives the drug key advantages which could greatly boost its efficiency against dangerous bacteria and reduce the chances of resistant strains developing, new research shows. The study, conducted by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) in the US, was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of … Read more

A novel antibiotic treatment inspired by our immune system

Researchers from the National University of Ireland Galway have developed a new antibacterial treatment, effective against drug-resistant bacteria, which takes inspiration from the human immune system. This treatment, called the ‘iodo-thiocyanate complex’, or ITC for short, also showed a low propensity to lead to the development of resistant bacterial strains. The paper was published on … Read more

New test could rapidly identify colistin-resistant bacteria

Researchers have found a method to identify bacteria showing one of the most dangerous forms of antibiotic resistance, in a test that’s both quick and cheap to run. Dr Laurent Dortet, an Associate Professor at South Paris University and his colleagues at Imperial College London, Dr Gerald Larrouy-Maumus and Professor Alain Filloux, presented their work … Read more

Researchers uncover the structure of anti-TB drug target, and identify a new weapon against the deadly disease

The fight against TB has taken several promising steps forward – scientists from Rutgers University have not only uncovered vital new information about how rifampicin, the frontline anti-TB drug, binds to its target, but have also discovered a completely new class of compounds that specifically kill TB bacteria. The paper was published in the journal … Read more

Not just a tasty snack – maple syrup can boost the power of antibiotics

Enjoy maple syrup with your pancakes? An ongoing study suggests that the popular kitchen companion contains extracts which could boost the power of antibiotics, significantly reducing the amount of drug needed to kill infectious bacteria. On the 2nd April, Dr. Nathalie Tufenkji presented the latest information on the study at the ‘253rd National Meeting & Exposition … Read more

Saving your eyesight: New research suggests chlorin e6 could protect against bacterial keratitis

A structure known as chlorin e6 (Ce6) could be used in photodynamic inactivation (PDI) therapy to protect patient’s eyes from the dangerous effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis, new research has shown. The paper, which was published on 15th March 2017 in Nature Scientific Reports, showed that when the eyes of mice were infected with multi-drug … Read more